FIRST LOOK: Keeping Up With The Aristocrats' Lord Ivar balks at husband James' suggestion they use a BEDSHEET on the tables - throwing plans for a lavish banquet into chaos

Keeping Up With The Aristocrats is set to shine a light on some of the wealthiest families in the UK, and their attempts to earn a living and stay in the upper-crust.

And in a first look clip from the debut episode, set to air on Monday, Lord Ivar Mountbatten can't hide his appall when his chef Jean-Christophe Novelli suggests they could use bedsheets in place of tablecloths for their pop-up restaurant.

Stunned at the idea and insisting they need the sheets for a wedding, Lord Ivar said they 'don't have the stock,' leading a furious Jean to  insist there won't be 'any compromise.'

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FIRST LOOK: Keeping Up With The Aristocrats' Lord Ivar balks at husband James' suggestion they use a BEDSHEET on the tables - throwing their plans for a lavish banquet into chaos

FIRST LOOK: Keeping Up With The Aristocrats' Lord Ivar balks at husband James' suggestion they use a BEDSHEET on the tables - throwing their plans for a lavish banquet into chaos

Lord Mountbatten, 58, a cousin of both the Queen and Prince Philip, is the proud owner, and window cleaner, of his mansion, 18th-century Bridwell Park in Devon.

The divorced father-of-three made history four years ago when he became the first British royal to enter into a same-sex marriage, with airline steward James Coyle. 

In the series, Lord Ivar and James try to earn a crust by organising a pop-up restaurant at the house in collaboration with French chef Jean-Christophe Novelli, charging guests £165 a head for an exclusive dinner.

The clip shows the pair in the midst of preparations for the evening, but discovering they do not have enough tablecloths to cover each place setting twice.

Wow! The couple reside in Bridwell Park, Devon, and are hoping to boost their finances by hosting a pop-up restaurant

Wow! The couple reside in Bridwell Park, Devon, and are hoping to boost their finances by hosting a pop-up restaurant

Drama: In a first look clip, the pair are in the midst of preparations for the evening, but discovering they do not have enough tablecloths to cover each place setting twice

Drama: In a first look clip, the pair are in the midst of preparations for the evening, but discovering they do not have enough tablecloths to cover each place setting twice

The Mountbattens

Lord Ivar Mountbatten is a third cousin once removed of Queen Elizabeth II and a first cousin, once removed of the late Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Although he is not a member of the British royal family, he is the first member of the British monarch's extended family openly in a same-sex relationship.

Queen Victoria was Lord Ivar's great-great-great grandmother, and he is a descendant of Alexander Pushkin.

He was educated at the same institution attended by Prince Philip and Prince Charles - Gordonstoun School. 

He separated from wife Penelope Anne Vere Thompson in September 2010 and divorced amicably in November 2011. 

In 2015, he converted their former home, Bridwell Park, into an exclusive-use venue for weddings, corporate functions, and business events.

In September 2016, Mountbatten revealed that he was in a relationship with cabin attendant James Coyle.

'We used to speak to each other so much over the phone that it was a bit like being on Cilia Black's Blind Date, talking to each other through the screen,' Ivar regaled

On 22 September 2018 they were married in a private ceremony on Mountbatten's estate of Bridwell Park - the first ever same-sex marriage in the extended Royal Family. 

His former wife walked him down the aisle and 'gave him away' - a suggestion their three children Ella, Alexandra and Louise offered.

 

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A shame: But stunned by the idea, Ivar says: 'We can't because a wedding coming through on Friday, we have to turn around every single person that's in this house'

A shame: But stunned by the idea, Ivar says: 'We can't because a wedding coming through on Friday, we have to turn around every single person that's in this house'

Fuming: Chef Jean is furious when Ivar turns down the idea, insisting they 'can't compromise' if they want the pop-up to be a success

Fuming: Chef Jean is furious when Ivar turns down the idea, insisting they 'can't compromise' if they want the pop-up to be a success

James tells Ivar: 'I was just explaining to Jean we don't have enough cloths to put two on each table, so he's suggested we use a flat sheet from the housekeeping.'

But stunned by the idea, Ivar says: 'We can't because a wedding coming through on Friday, we have to turn around every single person that's in this house and then get ready for Friday, we just don't have the stock. Sorry we can't do it.'

Before his employer walks away to begin dusting the wall, Jean states 'any suggestion is the best of us' and reminds him that the pop-up needs to be a positive representation of their estate.

Speaking to the camera, he adds: 'It's very easy to give up and cut corners, but it doesn't matter what we have to do, what matters tonight is that diners will be walking in, and they get the best service, and there is no compromise.

Alexandra Sitwell 

Renishaw Hall has been home to Alexandra Sitwell’s family for nearly 400 years.

Alexandra was brought up at Renishaw Hall from the age of seven, and inherited the estate in 2009. She is married to her husband Richard Hayward.

The couple have two adult children together. Alexandra loves the gardens and she credits her mother for continuing to expand and them.

Richard is a British businessman and was chairman of football club Wolverhampton Wanderers from 2003 to 2006.

Grade I listed Renishaw sits on 5,000 acres of land, with 10 acres of gardens. 

'I was brought up here from the age of seven onwards, it’s still very much a family home, I have lots of happy memories from living here,' revealed Alexandra.

The house was built in 1625 by George Sitwell, with further wings, rooms and gardens added later.

George Sitwell began his financial empire by mining iron ore.

The Sitwell family generated their wealth in the 16th and 17th centuries from iron-making and landowning. 

Renishaw was home to the literary Sitwell trio, siblings who established themselves as rivals to the Bloomsbury Set in the Twenties and Thirties.

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Grand: Others in the show include Alexandra Sitwell, 63, and her husband Rick. She inherited the 17th-century Grade I-listed Renishaw Hall (pictured) in Derbyshire

Grand: Others in the show include Alexandra Sitwell, 63, and her husband Rick. She inherited the 17th-century Grade I-listed Renishaw Hall (pictured) in Derbyshire 

Expensive taste: Alexandra was brought up at Renishaw Hall from the age of seven, and inherited the estate in 2009, and the Grade I listed Renishaw sits on 5,000 acres of land

Expensive taste: Alexandra was brought up at Renishaw Hall from the age of seven, and inherited the estate in 2009, and the Grade I listed Renishaw sits on 5,000 acres of land

Fans will have to wait and see whether the Mountbattens plans for a lavish meal are a success, bringing some much-needed income into the struggling estate.

Elsewhere, a second clip focuses on the sharp-tongued Alexandra Sitwell and her businessman husband Richard Hayward, who are planning to welcome several friends to view their vineyard.

Alexandra was brought up at Renishaw Hall from the age of seven, and inherited the estate in 2009, and the Grade I listed Renishaw sits on 5,000 acres of land, with 10 acres of gardens.

Hilarious: The clip sees Richard reveal an old wives tale about the ballroom garden on the estate, hinting that a specially-built door was used by man in need to a hasty toilet break

Hilarious: The clip sees Richard reveal an old wives tale about the ballroom garden on the estate, hinting that a specially-built door was used by man in need to a hasty toilet break

The clip sees Richard reveal an old wives tale about the ballroom garden on the estate, hinting that a specially-built door was used by man in need to a hasty toilet break.

He said: 'That little door over there, a huge amount of cutting through all the stone so the men could come out here and have a little pee rather than walking all the through to find the loo.'

Dismissing her husband's story, which he insisted he was told by her father, Alexandra scoffed: 'That's a figment of your imagination, totally, that's a porkie.'

'It makes sense too because men suddenly have to have a pee especially as they get a bit older and they don't want to run, it's a rather long way before they get to the loo, so they trot out here and have a quick whizz.'

Ridiculous: Dismissing her husband's story, which he insisted he was told by her father, Alexandra scoffed: 'That's a figment of your imagination, totally, that's a porkie'

Ridiculous: Dismissing her husband's story, which he insisted he was told by her father, Alexandra scoffed: 'That's a figment of your imagination, totally, that's a porkie'

That's handy! 'It makes sense too because men suddenly have to have a pee especially as they get a bit older and they don't want to run,' he insists

That's handy! 'It makes sense too because men suddenly have to have a pee especially as they get a bit older and they don't want to run,' he insists

The series is also set to feature Princess Olga Romanoff, who has a 13th century home in Kent.

She's a bona fide member of the Russian aristocracy, whose great-uncle Tsar Nicholas II was murdered by the Bolsheviks in 1918. 

Olga is also a cousin of the Queen, is related to Prince Philip and was once considered an eligible match for Prince Charles

While Olga's blood may be as blue as the Danube, she's far more likely to be seen mucking out at her 13th-century home in Kent than quaffing champagne. 

Huge house: The series is also set to feature Princess Olga Romanoff, who has a 13th century home in Kent

Huge house: The series is also set to feature Princess Olga Romanoff, who has a 13th century home in Kent

'I'm not your ordinary princess,' she says. 'At home you'll find me shovelling s***, sadly, not eating caviar.' 

'Only children expect a princess in a tiara and a frilly dress,' she says.

'Adults might sometimes raise an eyebrow because I smell of horses and don't wear make-up, but they're too polite to say so.'

Olga's pile is medieval Provender House near Faversham, which she inherited 21 years ago upon the death of her mother (her father, Nicholas II's nephew, had escaped to England).

The House of Romanov

Princess Olga is a descendent of The House Of Romanov, which was the reigning imperial house of Russia from 1613 to 1917.

They achieved prominence after the Tsarina, Anastasia Romanova was married to the First Tsar of Russia, Ivan the Terrible.

Olga is the daughter of Prince Andrew Romanoff who was the eldest nephew of the murdered Tsar Nicholas II – the last emperor of Russia.

Tsar Nicholas II, his wife Tsarina Alexandra and their five children were massacred in 1918, bringing a brutal end to the royal dynasty in Russia.

The Romanov's were first associated with Provender House in 1890 and her grandmother, Sylvia McDougall, bought it in 1912 for her mother.

Born in London, Olga moved to Provender House when she was just a week old and was home-schooled there, before moving between the city, Scotland and Kent

She settled permanently following the death of her mother in 2000.

Olga has restored the 13th century mansion and opened it to tourists.

She also ventured into reality TV, appearing on Australian Princess to give advice. The premise to scour the country to find 12 young Australian women and give them the journey of their lives.

In 2017 she published a memoir, Princess Olga, A Wild and Barefoot Romanov.  

Olga was once considered a possible bride for her third cousin and heir to the throne, Prince Charles. 

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Pictured: Provender House, is owned by Princess Olga Romanoff, and she generates income by renting out a wing of the house via Airbnb and by giving £14-a-head tours to tourists

Pictured: Provender House, is owned by Princess Olga Romanoff, and she generates income by renting out a wing of the house via Airbnb and by giving £14-a-head tours to tourists

By then the money had run out and it was a ramshackle wreck. 'It's still falling down, £2.5 million later,' says Olga dryly. 

'I had to sell some of our Russian heirlooms to fund it.'

Today she generates income by renting out a wing of the house via Airbnb and by giving £14-a-head tours to busloads of tourists. 

Olga hopes the series will reveal the reality of life for today's blue bloods.

'Hopefully it'll show people that we don't sit on our backsides doing sweet FA,' she says bluntly. 'We actually get off them and try to make the place pay.'

Keeping Up With The Aristocrats begins on Monday 17 January at 9pm on ITV. 

Down to earth: While Olga's blood may be as blue as the Danube, she's far more likely to be seen mucking out at her 13th-century home in Kent than quaffing champagne

Down to earth: While Olga's blood may be as blue as the Danube, she's far more likely to be seen mucking out at her 13th-century home in Kent than quaffing champagne 

Lord Gerald Fitzalan Howard 

Gerald and Emma moved up to live at Carlton Towers in November 1990. 

Their first baby, Arthur, was one month old and nobody had lived at Carlton Towers for 20 years.

Gerald is the youngest child of Miles Fitzalan-Howard, 17th Duke of Norfolk, and Anne Constable-Maxwell.

Miles inherited both the Beaumont and Howard of Glossop baronies, becoming the 12th Baron Beaumont. 

Miles' mother, Lady Beaumont owned Carlton for 76 years, a period which saw two world wars and great social change. 

In the Second World War the house was used as an auxiliary military hospital but suffered little damage.

Carlton was carefully restored to its original condition afterwards, at a time when many other large Victorian houses were being demolished.

Emma moved to London when she was eighteen years old and began working for a recruitment company, eventually serving as an associate director.

She met Gerald at a wedding in 1988 and the couple wed in 1990. 

In order to fund reconstruction on the house and open it up to tourists, Emma had to sell off family property, including furniture, paintings, silverware, and family heirlooms, to raise over one million pounds. 

 

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FIRST LOOK: Keeping Up With The Aristocrats' Lord Ivar balks at using a bedsheet as a tablecloth

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